How to Get Music for Your Video

By Kirkland Video Production |

If you’re making video for your company, you’ve at some point thought about how to obtain a piece of music for the video. A lot of companies tell me they want to avoid using “elevator music” which seems to be the general street term for stock music. A lot of stock music might have sounded like elevator music at some point in the past, but these days, the world of online stock music is incredibly vast. If there is a popular song or genre of music that you like, you can easily find a similar sounding piece of stock music. The advantage: Well…licensing popular music will cost a ton of money (think tens of thousands of dollars), whereas licensing the rights to use stock music with a similar style and sound is in the $20 to $50 dollar range.

On the lower cost end of the stock music spectrum is audiojungle.net with a vast selection of great stock music starting at just $19 for most pieces. On the high end are online music curators like premiumbeats.com and istockmusic.com, with prices starting around $40 to $50 for a single piece of music. Also on my radar for good stock music are the websites motionarray.com and pond5.com. While their selections are a little more limited, you can often find great stock music picks at a very reasonable price. If you find out you don’t like any of those online stock music purveyors, you can quickly search on “stock music” in Google and find tons of other useful websites.

Once you’ve found a good piece of stock music for your video, you can create an account, download it, and give it to your video editor. However, it is far easier to have your video editor download it for you, since video editors tend to already have accounts with lots of stock music websites. After that, the editor can add your chosen piece of stock music to the video. If you have the editor download the music for you, there is one caveat: They need to transfer the rights to use the music to you or your company. Since they downloaded the music through their own personal or company account, technically they own the rights until they transfer those rights to you. Transferring the rights to the music is accomplished pretty easily though. Simply have the editor or video company send you an invoice for their services listing the name of the stock music piece and the stock music website from which it was obtained. In that way, the editor or video company is transferring the rights to use the music to you and there will never be any question as to whether you have the right to use the music in your company’s video. It’ also advisable to read and understand the stock music website’s terms and conditions because some of them have stipulations on the way that their stock music can be used.

If you are making video for your company, there are a lot of little pieces of the video production process that it’s good to know about because it will help you save time and money on your overall video production costs. I’ll try to highlight a lot of these in future articles. Until then, thank you for reading!

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